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Hamersly Library

Information and Reference Desk: FAQ

For students and staff of the information/reference desk

Frequently Asked Questions

FAQS

Where are the periodicals located?

How do I find a title/article…etc?

How do I find a book on reserve?

How do I use microfilm/fiche?

Do we have video/audio?

Where are the style manuals?

How do I cite internet sources?

Where are biographical encyclopedias?

Where are the language dictionaries?

Where are the study manuals?

How do I print PowerPoint slides?

Information on the sculptures, tapestry, art exhibits

How can I access the Library Catalog and databases from home?

Other book sources?

How can I find a children’s book on ____?

How do I know if you have this journal?

How can I find an article on sports?

Where can I find a map of ________?

How can I get this __________ (article, book, other)?

How do I interpret this bibliographic citation and figure out where to search to find this item?

How do I renew a book?

What is Summit?

I requested a book on Summit, how can I check to see if it has arrived?

How do I log in?

Why can’t I physically find this book?

Where can I find the ORS?

How to find a periodical issue.

Reading holding statements from A-Z Journals list

ERIC, ERIC documents, ERIC journals…

Community user policy questions.

Do you have a fax?

Questions about library fines.

 

 

  1. Where are the periodicals located?

The periodicals start with the tall shelves on the left side of the aisle in the reference collection. The periodicals and journals are arranged alphabetically by title. They start with ‘A’ and go through ‘J’ on the first floor. The periodicals continue on the second floor with ‘K’ through ‘Z’, same side of the room…so just take the elevator or go up the main stairs and as you head down the center aisle they’ll be on the left.

Note: this sounds like a straightforward directional question, but it is often a reference question in disguise. Always ask if the patron has a specific citation they are looking for and follow up with appropriate questions to determine whether the patron should be referred to the librarian on duty for help finding needed articles.

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  1. How do I find a title/article…etc?

Unless the patron has a specific citation and just needs to know where the journal is located- this is most likely a reference question. Be prepared to draw the reference person into the interaction, depending on the depth of the question. Always refer the question to the reference person if you are tempted to say that we do not have or can not access a particular item.

 Is the patron looking for a journal or a book? If the item is a book, do a title search in the Library Catalog and then in Summit. If the patron has a journal title, do a title search in the Library Catalog using the periodical title list and see if it comes up. If it does, what’s the call number, on which floor is it located, and is it available? Is the item on microfilm or microfiche? If so, offer to show the patron how to locate the microform and use the microform readers. Turn the screen toward the patron and go through the screens slowly so the patron can see where you are finding the information.

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  1. How do I find a book on reserve?

Instructors put books and other materials on reserve for their students. To see what a particular instructor has on reserve, start at the library home page. Choose the ‘course reserves’ link and then enter the course abbreviation and number (i.e WRT 115). Show the patron where to find the call number and explain that they should write the number down and then take it to the checkout desk.

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  1. How do I use microfilm/fiche?

If a patron wants to use the digital microform reader, they can reference the user guide on the counter by the machine. The older machines have cards explaining how to use them. If you’re uncomfortable using these, refer the patron to your on-call reference person.

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  1. Do we have video/audio?

Yes. Our audiovisual collection is on the second floor. From the main staircase, go down the center aisle. Audiovisual materials are located in the last row of shelves on the right. There are also recreational videos (more recent, popular movies) available in the recreational collection on the first floor.

 All of our study rooms are equipped with VCRs, DVD players, and boom boxes. In addition, the workstations surrounding the video/DVD collection are equipped with TVs, VCRs, DVD players, and headphones.

 The DVD cases are on the shelves but the actual DVDs are in the reserve room behind the checkout desk. The videos are in the cases on the shelves.

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  1. Where are the style manuals?

The most common style manuals are APA, MLA and sometimes the Chicago Style Manual. We have copies of these manuals in the collection. To find style manual call numbers in the Library Catalog, do a keyword search of ‘style manual’ and you should see entries for each of the most popular. Please note that the APA style manual is called the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

There are also links to APA and MLA on our research guides.

If someone needs help using a citation manual- refer them to the reference person.

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  1. How do I cite internet sources?

When appropriate, give the patron the call number for the appropriate citation manual or show the patron how to get to the style and citation manual resources on our website (see directions above) and then point out the link under APA called ‘citing electronic resources’ or the link under MLA called ‘MLA style FAQ’. If the patron has a very specific problem that can’t be solved by looking at the research guide, then refer them to the on-call reference person.

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  1. Where are biographical encyclopedias?

This is a reference question. We have many print and online resources for biographical information. In the reference collection, general biographical reference materials are in the CTs. There are also biographical resources within specific subject areas, such as literature or science. Wilson Biography Search Plus is one example of an online database that indexes biographical information.

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  1. Where are the language dictionaries?

English and non-English dictionaries are in the reference collection together. They are arranged by type of language and English is actually between the romance languages and Russian. If you take a patron to that reference section, understand that there are non-English language dictionaries on both sides of the English dictionaries. This will make sense when you look at that section. To locate language dictionaries in the Library Catalog, do a keyword search. For French, do a keyword search of French language dictionary. For German, do a keyword search of German language dictionary…etc. Assure the patron that they are welcome to take the dictionary and use it at their workstation. Also mention that there are various dictionaries in the general stacks that are available for checkout if the patron is looking for something to take out of the library. Tell them that they do not have to reshelve materials, we like to do the reshelving because we take statistics on what is being used.

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  1. Where are the study manuals?

When appropriate, determine the exam for which the patron is studying and look in the Library Catalog to see if there is a study manual available. For example, if the patron is studying for the GRE, look up GRE as a keyword search in the Library Catalog. You will see a number of entries under GRE, many of which are study manuals. Does the patron need study material for a particular subject or section or something that covers the entire test? Is the patron looking for something to take home or to use here in the library? Has the patron already looked online?

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  1. How do I print PowerPoint slides?

This is an information question. Are the slides online? If so, save them as a PowerPoint presentation first so the option for printing as a handout will appear under printing. This allows the patron to choose how many to print per page.

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  1. Information on the sculptures, tapestry, art exhibits

One piece installed outside the West Portico is called, Three Elementsby Michihiro Kosuge.

The three stone sculptures outside the Hamersly Library are by Portland artist, Michihiro Kosuge, a Professor of Art at Portland State University, who has numerous installations in Oregon, Washington, and California, including many commissions for public buildings. The artist entitled his work "Three Elements." He considers the sculpture nearest the sidewalk and street as an entrance marker for the library. The markings on the sculpture, made of basalt rock from the Columbia River Gorge, evoke the image of a winter tree. The boulder on the south retaining wall of the entry plaza is made of black Sierra granite. The main work, near the building entrance, is a tall sculpture with different kinds of stone and shapes. The top stone is white Sierra granite, the middle is black Sierra granite, and the base is columnar basalt rock. Kosuge explains that "each stone features a highly polished area to emphasize the play between man-made and natural textures. My hope is that the viewer 'discovers' the sculpture, enjoying its scale and texture and its relationship with the varying weather."

 The tapestry that hangs in the main stairwell inside the Hamersly Library is entitled "Soliloquy" and was woven by Salem, Oregon artist and former instructor at Sprague High School, Shelley Socolofsky. Socolofsky has numerous installations throughout Oregon, including many in public buildings. Socolofsky uses "Gobelins Tapestry" technique - a method developed in Europe during the middle ages from century’s old cloth making traditions. Tapestries were used as a narrative documentation of the times and were considered extremely valuable. They were often traded for prisoners of war and decorated the insides of war tents, churches, castles and houses to prevent draft.

 Artist's Design Concept: Upon ascending the staircase, the tapestry's imagery begins to unfold - as a journey of discovery and new awareness - a metaphor that is appropriate for a place of discovery through expanded knowledge such as a university library. There is an 'opening' within the maiden's forehead - a cloudscape suggesting imagination, open-minded thinking, creative expansion and a search for new ideas. Her hair flows upward above her head. Her hair begins to transform into winter tree branches. At the top of the tapestry she has metamorphosed into a tree. There are baby birds in the tips of her branches - mouths open, upward symbolizing drinking in new knowledge, new thoughts, and new ideas. Excerpts from a Anne Sexton poem, are woven into the tapestry down each border. The text is legible yet subtle; its intention is meant more for rhythm than to be read literally.

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  1. How can I access the Library Catalog and databases from home?

From the library website, follow links to access the desired database. The proxy server will prompt the patron to enter his or her network username and password. To see a sample of the proxy server log in screen, go to the site index under p and choose proxy server- scroll down a bit and there will be a sample.

 If the patron is entering information correctly at the prompt and is still unable to access the databases, it could be one of several issues.

- It may be that our records have not been updated since they registered for classes and so our system does not recognize them as authorized users. Notify the circulation supervisor.

- There could be a firewall or other operating system in place that does not allow our system to authenticate them as users.

- The patron may need to go to www.wou.edu/accountlookup and reset their password so the system will recognize it.

Several library computers are set up to go through the proxy server. Please write down the patron’s name and contact information, a description of the problem, date and time, and your initials. Give this message to the reference person on duty, or to Jackson.

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  1. Other book sources?

Summit, WorldCat, ILL, public libraries, bookstores, drive to another campus. Refer this question to the reference person on duty.

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  1. How can I find a children’s book on ____? 

Do a keyword search in the Library Catalog and limit location to juvenile collection. If they can't find what they're looking for there, try searching the public library through www.ccrls.org

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  1. How do I know if you have this journal? 

Use the journal title search on the library homepage. Enter the title exactly or choose title keyword search. Entries will display each kind of access (paper, microform, electronic online…etc) with coverage dates.

 Follow by asking the patron if they are looking for a particular article or articles in general and refer them to the reference person if they need help finding materials.

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  1. How can I find an article on sports? 

This is a reference question. When appropriate, if the reference person is assisting another patron, direct the patron to log on to a computer and show the patron how to access the subject links under journal articles and databases.  The patron can log on and start browsing while waiting for the reference person.

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  1. Where can I find a map of ________?

Most maps are located on the East side of the first floor near the printers. Others are available in the oversize collection. You can also try a subject search using the name of the place followed by the word maps. This type of search will often bring up a few results, but it is not representative of our collection. You can also try a keyword search and limit the material type to maps. Atlases may also be helpful depending on what the patron is working on.

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  1. How can I get this __________ (article, book, other)? 

For an article, either use the database search or “find it @ wou.” If we have it, it will come up there. If it doesn’t come up, search in Google Scholar to see if it is accessible there. For books and other physical materials search in Primo to see if it is available at WOU or through Summit. If it is not, check Worldcat to see if it can be requested there.

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  1. How do I interpret this bibliographic citation and figure out where to search to find this item?

First determine the type of material to which the citation refers.

·         Is it a book? Check our catalog- if we do not have it, check Summit, if Summit does not have it, check WorldCat.

·         Is it an article? Determine the source- usually the name of the journal in which the article was published. After determining the article source, do a Journal Title search to see what kind of access we have for the specific volume and issue needed. Also search appropriate databases, including Academic Search Premier, Article First/First Search, and JSTOR.

 Do the Desk Challenge called “Citation Challenge” as a way to learn how to track down citations.

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  1. How do I renew a book?

-  At the checkout desk (in person or calling)

-  At the info desk (in person or calling)

-   Online from the library home page, choose My Library (right side of the screen). Log in using full name and v-number. There is a link to look up the v-number with the social security number in case the patron does not know his or her v-number. This link is also useful for patrons who want to order items via Summit, but don’t remember their v-number.

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  1. What is Summit? 

The Orbis Cascade Alliance is a consortium of academic libraries in Oregon and Washington that have agreed to share materials. The combined catalog of libraries participating in the consortium is called Summit. We often use Summit to refer to both the libraries and the catalogs. Summit libraries have agreed to share books. We ship and receive Summit books daily, Monday through Friday.

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  1. I requested a book on Summit, how can I check to see if it has arrived?

-   Checkout desk (in person or over the phone)

-   Info Desk (in person or over the phone)

-  View your own record online (see directions for renewing books)

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  1. How do I log in?

The user name is generally the first initial of the patron’s first name followed by the patron’s last name and the last two digits of the year he or she became a student at Western. For example, Kathy Alderson who became a student winter term 2006 would be kalderson06. If the patron has the same initial and last name of someone else on campus, then his or her patron name may follow a slightly different pattern. Patrons create a password by going to wou.edu/accountlookup and setting their email and network password. Their new password will be at least seven characters long and will include three of the following: an uppercase letter, a lowercase letter, a number and a symbol. Patrons who forget their password can use the same process to set a new password (we are not able to look up passwords, so if a patron forgets, they will have to set a new one). The email user name and password is the same as the network account name and password.

 If they still can not log on, direct the patron to ITC 008 to report the problem or to call the UCS helpdesk at 8-8925. The UCS staff members who are able to resolve computer account problems are available Mon-Fri, 8:00am to 5:00pm, so after hours and on weekends, offer to log them on as a community user and advise them to go to ITC 008 between 8:00am-5:00pm Mon-Fri.

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  1. Why can’t I physically find this book?

- Unavailable/checked out?

- New book area? Reshelving cart?

-  In reserve room?

- Oversized?

-  In tech services?

-  Found in Summit?

-  Looking in general stacks instead of reference or vice-versa?

-  On Microfilm or fiche?

-  Not a book- maybe a journal, video, or cd?

-  Juvenile collection?

-  OAIM collection, not Curriculum or vice-versa

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  1. Where can I find the ORS?

Reference question. From the library site index, choose Government Information, scroll down a bit and under Oregon State Government there are links to the Oregon Revised Statutes and the Oregon Administrative Rules.

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  1. How to find a periodical issue.

Sometimes a new set of eyes is needed when looking for a periodical. Patrons do not always understand that different issues of the same journals may be bound, loose, on microform, or in the viewing area. You may need to walk to the shelf and take a careful look to help them find the issue they need. If it is truly not on the shelf, is it checked out? Someone may be using the issue. Look on shelving carts. Refer to reference person for helping finding needed article online.

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  1. Reading holding statements from A-Z Journals list

The periodical list will show the years, volumes, and issues we have for each journal, and also show the kind of format we have access to (paper, microform, online). Practice looking up journal titles and carefully studying the records so that you become very familiar with the way our library catalog shows our journal holdings. When you have time, go to the periodicals’ title list and enter New York Times. Click on the different kinds of format options and practice reading the holdings we have for each.

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  1. ERIC, ERIC documents, ERIC journals…

This is generally a reference question. We have ERIC documents (ED number) on microfiche. For ERIC journals, we have to look for the journal just as we would when tracking down any journal citation. We have ERIC indexed online through several vendors including Ebsco.

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  1. Community user policy questions.

Guests can use computers so long as we have at least three available for students to use. We ask them to sign in at the Information Desk by showing a photo ID which we use to log their name into an excel spreadsheet along with the time they arrive, the login # we use, and the computer workstation #, and our initials. Tell the guest that if they print, it is $.05 per page and pages will come to the printer behind the reference desk and we will get the pages for them. When the patron is done, enter the time logged out in our spreadsheet.

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  1. Do you have a fax?

We do have a fax machine, it is located at the end of the 1st floor hallway by the elevator. It can only send, not receive faxes. If patrons need to receive a fax they can do so in the bookstore. They can also send from there at a slightly lower price than is available in the library.

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  1. Questions about library fines.

For paying fines, direct people to the cashier’s window on the first floor of the Administration Building. For disputing fines, there is a form at the checkout desk. Refer questions about fines to the circulation desk supervisor.

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