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APA Style Guide 7th Edition

General Guidelines for Indirect Quote

  • An indirect quote is when you quote a source that is quoted and cited in another source. For example if you were reading this article by Michele Kane but wanted to use the Amy Saltzman quote (highlighted) that would be an example of an indirect quote.

        There is increased stress and anxiety for highly sensitive and emotionally intense gifted teens who
        witness daily the ills of the world combined with the challenges of navigating adolescence. Gratefully,
        mindfulness practices create oases of calm and peace while being portable, unobtrusive, low/no cost,
        and as the research shows, highly effective. So, what is mindfulness? While definitions abound, most
        mindfulness definitions embrace the elements of that of Amy Saltzman (2014): “Mindfulness is paying
         attention to your life, here and now, with kindness and curiosity” (p. 1).

  • As a general rule, you should try to avoid using indirect quotes. If there is a quote in a source from another book or article that you want to use, find the original source of that quote and cite it. Only quote an indirect source when absolutely necessary, for instance, when the original work is out of print or unavailable, or in a foreign language.
  • If you use an indirect quote, include the source it originated from in your parenthetical citation, followed by the words “as cited in” and then the source you obtained it from.
  • You only include the source you obtained it from in your reference page.

Indirect Quotation with Page Numbers 

In the following example, Kane is the source in which the Saltzman quote was found:

A common definition is “mindfulness is paying attention to your life, here and now, with kindness and curiosity”  (Saltzman, 2014, p.1, as cited in Kane, 2020, p. 117). 

Note - You would cite the Kane article in your reference page 

Indirect Quotation Without Page Numbers 

In the following example, Koehler is the source in which the Schulte quote was found:

"Neuroscience is finding that when we are idle, in leisure, our brains are most active. The Default Mode Network lights up, which, like airport hubs, connects parts of our brain that don't typically communicate. So a stray thought, a random memory, an image can combine in novel ways to produce novel ideas" (Schulte, 2014, as cited in Koehler, 2019, para. 14). 

Note - You would cite the Koehler article in your reference page.